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[Others] TEN BOOKS ABOUT BOLLYWOOD:

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Post time: 12-1-2019 18:08:40
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TEN BOOKS ABOUT BOLLYWOOD:

1.
Bollywood and Postmodernism: Popular Indian Cinema in the 21st Century:            Neelam Sidhar Wright:
Applying postmodern concepts and locating postmodern motifs in key commercial Hindi films, this innovative study reveals how Indian cinema has changed in the 21st century.



2.
Twenty-First Century Bollywood:            Ajay Gehlawat:
Key changes have emerged in Bollywood in the new millennium. Twenty-First Century Bollywood traces the emerging shifts in both the content and form of Bollywood cinema and examines these new tendencies in relation to the changing dynamics of Indian culture. The book historically situates these emerging trends in relation to previous norms, and develops new, innovative paradigms for conceptualizing Bollywood in the twenty-first century.
The particular shifts in contemporary Bollywood cinema that the book examines include the changing nature of the song and dance sequence, the evolving representations of male and female sexuality, and the increasing presence of whiteness as a dominant trope in Bollywood cinema. It also focuses…
Shifting the focus back on the cinematic elements of contemporary films themselves, the book analyses Bollywood films by considering the film dynamics on their own terms, and related to their narrative and aesthetic usage, rather than through an analysis of large-scale industrial practices. It will be of interest to students and scholars of South Asian Studies, Film Studies, and Cultural Studies
3. Brand Bollywood: A New Global Entertainment Order:
            Derek Bose:

Based on original research, this book draws on the author's personal observations and extensive discussions with film makers, media professionals and market players. It is backed by data from a variety of surveys, audit studies and annual reports. Derek Bose uses these sources to arrive at conclusions that place the issue of media convergence in the framework of film development.

4.
Bollywood and Globalization: Indian Popular Cinema, Nation, and Diaspora :(eds.):Rini Bhattacharya Mehta, Rajeshwari V. Pandharipande:

Commercial cinema has always been one of the biggest indigenous industries in India, and remains so in the post-globalization era, when Indian economy has entered a new phase of global participation, liberalization and expansion. Issues of community, gender, society, social and economic justice, bourgeois-liberal individualism, secular nationhood and ethnic identity are nowhere more explored in the Indian cultural mainstream than in commercial cinema. As Indian economy and policy have gone through a sea-change after the end of the Cold War and the commencement of the Global Capital, the largest cultural industry has followed suit. This book is a significant addition to the study of post-Global Indian culture. The articles represent a variety…

5.
Is It All About Hips?: Around the World with Bollywood Dance:            Sangita Shresthova:

In this brilliant ethnography, Sangita Sresthova, who has pioneered various dance forms brings alive the world of Bollywood dance. You embark upon this exhilarating journey at a live performance in London, and travel with the author discovering how this unique dance form has united peoples and cultures far and wide. Behind-the-stage preparations and dance classes booming with desi exuberance come to life with a panorama of colorful stills, making this book is the first-of-its-kind account of the Bollywood dance culture flourishing worldwide.
6.
Global Bollywood: Travels of Hindi Song and Dance:            Sangita Gopal, Sujata Moorti:

As a student of the Hindi film, this book is a rich resource on the music of the Hindi film. Many times film music is more popular than the film--being released prior to the film, film music is often the bellweather as to a film's success or failure!!  This volume will give you new insight into how music is made, marketed and exploited to enhance a film's success, or failure!

7.
From Bombay to Bollywood: The Making of a Global Media Industry:            Aswin Punathambekar:

From Bombay to Bollywood analyzes the transformation of the national film industry in Bombay into a transnational and multi-media cultural enterprise, which has come to be known as Bollywood. Combining ethnographic, institutional, and textual analyses, Aswin Punathambekar explores how relations between state institutions, the Indian diaspora, circuits of capital, and new media technologies and industries have reconfigured the Bombay-based industry’s geographic reach. Providing in-depth accounts of the workings of media companies and media professionals, Punathambekar has produced a timely analysis of how a media industry in the postcolonial world has come to claim the global as its scale of operations.   Based on extensive field research in India and the U.S., this book offers empirically-rich and theoretically-informed analyses of how the imaginations and practices of industry professionals give shape to the media worlds we inhabit and engage with. Moving beyond a focus on a single medium, Punathambekar develops a comparative and integrated approach that examines four different but interrelated media industries--film, television, marketing, and digital media. Offering a path-breaking account of media convergence in a non-Western context, Punathambekar’s transnational approach to understanding the formation of Bollywood is an innovative intervention into current debates on media industries, production cultures, and cultural globalization. Aswin Punathambekar is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. He is the co-editor of Global Bollywood (NYU Press, 2008). In the Postmillenial Pop series   

8.
Bollywood and Its Other(s): Towards New Configurations:            Vikrant Kishore, Amit Sarwal, Parichay Patra (eds.):




With the disciplinary incarnation of film studies in India, ‘Bollywood’
ceases to be a loosely applied term, even though academicians and
industry persons differ considerably on its usage. Bollywood refers to the
globalized cinema and media cultures of the industry located in Bombay
(now Mumbai), and it is associated with the economic l iberalization
of the 1990s and some subsequent corollaries. Bombay cinema in the
pre-liberalization era is referred to as Hindi popular cinema. Around
the early 1990s, the neologism ‘Bollywood’ became attached to the
Mumbai-based commercial Hindi cinema. Ashish Rajadhyaksha (2007)
has defined Bollywood as an industry where cinema itself is reduced
only to a memory, a part of the nostalgia industry. He has mentioned
how the film trade journals like Screen invented and circulated the selfdeprecating
term through their page called ‘Bollywood Beat’. In order
to define culture economically, Rajadhyaksha concentrates on the larger
significance of the culture industry beyond the confines of traditional
cinema exhibition, the emergence of the corporate- industrial-financial
capital and the proliferation of the ancillary sector of film production/
exhibition. Above all, the export of a globalized version of Indian
nationalism to be consumed by the diaspora finds an extremely
significant place in his argument. Most of the anthologies published
recently focus primarily on the

9.
Conjugations: Marriage and Form in New BollywoodCinema:            Sangita Gopal:
Bollywood movies have been long known for their colorful song-and-dance numbers and knack for combining drama, comedy, action-adventure, and music. But when India entered the global marketplace in the early 1990s, its film industry transformed radically. Production and distribution of films became regulated, advertising and marketing created a largely middle-class audience, and films began to fit into genres like science fiction and horror. In this bold study of what she names New Bollywood, Sangita Gopal contends that the key to understanding these changes is to analyze films’ evolving treatment of romantic relationships.
Gopalargues that the form of the conjugal duo in movies reflects other social forces in India’s new consumerist and global society. She takes a daring look at recent Hindi films and movie trends—the decline of song-and-dance sequences, the upgraded status of the horror genre, and the rise of the multiplex and multi-plot—to demonstrate how these relationships exemplify different formulas of contemporary living. A provocative account of how cultural artifacts can embody globalization’s effects on intimate life, Conjugations will shake up the study of Hindi film.   



10.
Hong Kong and Bollywood: Globalization of Asian Cinemas:            Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, Satish Kolluri (eds.):


This volume examines the transmission, reception, and reproduction of new cinematic styles, meanings, practices, and norms in early twenty-first-century Asia. Hong Kong and Bollywood offers new answers to the field of inter-Asian cultural studies, which has been energized by the trends towards transnationalism and translatability. It brings together a team of international scholars to capture the latest development in the film industries of Hong Kong and Mumbai, and to explore similar cross-cultural, political, and socioeconomic issues. It also explains how Hong Kong and Bollywood filmmakers have gone beyond the traditional focus on nationalism, urbanity and biculturalism to reposition themselves as new cultural forces in the…




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 Author| Post time: 13-1-2019 16:56:33
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TEN MORE BOOKS ON BOLLYWOOD:

1. BEYOND BOLLYWOOD: JIGNA DESAI:
2. The Slumdog Phenomenon: A Critical Anthology:Ajay Gehlawat:
3. Logics of Globalization: Studies in International Communications:Anandam Kavoori:
4. Cinema, Law, and the State in Asia:Corey K. Creekmur, Mark Sidel:

5. Reframing Bollywood: Theories of Popular Hindi Cinema:Ajay Gehlawat:
6. The Magic of Bollywood: At Home and Abroad:Anjali Gera Roy:
7. Brave New Bollywood: In Conversation with Contemporary Hindi Filmmakers:Nirmal Kumar, Preeti Chaturvedi:
8. Bollywood Shakespeares:Craig Dionne, Parmita Kapadia (eds.):

9. Film Tourism in Asia: Evolution, Transformation, and Trajectory:Sangkyun Kim, Stijn Reijnders (eds.):
10. Bollywood Sounds: The Cosmopolitan Mediations of Hindi Film Song:Jayson Beaster-Jones:
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1. Beyond Bollywood: The Cultural Politics of South Asian Diasporic Film:Jigna Desai:



Beyond Bollywood is the first comprehensive look at the emergence, development, and significance of contemporary South Asian diasporic cinema. From a feminist and queer perspective, Jigna Desai explores the hybrid cinema of the ''Brown Atlantic'' through a close look at films in English from and about South Asian diasporas in the United States, Canada, and Britain, including such popular films as My Beautiful Laundrette, Fire, Monsoon Wedding, and Bend it Like Beckham.


2. The Slumdog Phenomenon: A Critical Anthology:Ajay Gehlawat:


“The ‘Slumdog’ Phenomenon” addresses multiple issues related to “Slumdog Millionaire” and, in the process, provides new ways of looking at this controversial film. Each of the book’s four sections considers a particular aspect of the film: its relation to the nation, to the slum, to Bollywood and its reception. The volume provides a critical overview of the key issues and debates stemming from the film, and allows readers to reexamine them in light of the anthology’s multiple perspectives.

3. Logics of Globalization: Studies in International Communications:Anandam Kavoori:



The Logics of Globalization provides students and scholars of international communication a critical language through which to interrogate the flow of global media culture. Drawing on transnational cultural studies, the book offers analysis of popular culture_focusing on film, video games, music, sports, cell phones, and performance.

4. Cinema, Law, and the State in Asia:Corey K. Creekmur, Mark Sidel



This book crosses the conventional border between the analysis of on-screen and off-screen intersections of law and cinema.  It not only addresses the representation of law on screen (for example, through discussions of how lawyers, police, and prisons are depicted, or how courtroom sequences function as narratives), but also focuses on how the state shapes and regulates cinema.  The volume addresses the distinct contexts of China, India, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and Vietnam, along with an integrative introduction that puts the essays and themes into context for scholars and students alike.

5. Reframing Bollywood: Theories of Popular Hindi Cinema:Ajay Gehlawat:



This book combines multiple theoretical approaches to provide a fresh perspective on Bollywood—just as a Bollywood film that transgresses multiple genres—and challenges the homogenizing tendencies in much of the ongoing scholarship in the area. It covers five areas of controversial theorization: the religious frame, the musical frame, the subaltern frame, the (hetero) sexual frame and the ‘crossover’ frame. By deconstructing each of these hegemonic paradigms, it reshapes the understanding of a Bollywood film and restructures its relationships with multiple disciplines including film and theatre studies, postcolonial studies, South Asian studies, queer studies, and transnational studies.

6. The Magic of Bollywood: At Home and Abroad:Anjali Gera Roy:


This anthology aims to portray the soft power of Bollywood, which makes it a unique and powerful disseminator of Indian culture and values abroad. The essays in the book examine Bollywood s popularity within and outside South Asia, focusing on its role in international relations and diplomacy. Established and emerging scholars in literature, theater, film, dance, music, media, cultural studies, and sociology from different parts of the world present their views from multidisciplinary perspectives based on case studies from Australia, New Zealand, the UK, Germany, Russia, the US, Senegal, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia and Canada, in addition to India.

7. Brave New Bollywood: In Conversation with Contemporary Hindi Filmmakers:Nirmal Kumar, Preeti Chaturvedi:



These are interesting times in the history of Indian cinema, particularly because the established aesthetic conventions and modes of production of the Hindi film industry are being challenged, as are the boundaries between what is alternative and what is mainstream. This book is an attempt to contextualize the upsurge in this form of cinema in Bollywood/Hindi film industry.

It also aims to promote an academic enquiry into the works of these filmmakers, their religious beliefs, social moorings, cinematic influences, attitudes towards filmmaking and experiences of making movies. It will be an important reading for serious students of South Asian studies, film studies and media studies as well as the general reader who has an interest in cinema.  

8. Bollywood Shakespeares:Craig Dionne, Parmita Kapadia (eds.):



Play this game. Describe the formal elements of Bollywood cinema,
but try not to use the references to nation or other historical markers
that describe its roots in specific cultural types of theaters or genres.
For instance, instead of saying “it is indebted to Parsi theater,” you would
have to say “it borrows from the an age-old theatre based in feudal romance
and its tropes—realism and fantasy, snide humor, catchy folk songs, feats of
daring or heroism from local legends, use of dazzling stage effects.” Describe
its use of dance in the same way: instead of saying “northern Indian folk
dance,” describe the way it plays off of “festival dancing” noting the separation
from the plot, often interspersed free from flow of the narrative.


9.  Film Tourism in Asia: Evolution, Transformation, and Trajectory:Sangkyun Kim, Stijn Reijnders (eds.):


This book focuses on film tourism: the phenomenon of people visiting locations from popular film or TV series. It is based on a unique, Asian perspective, encompassing case studies from around the pan-Asian region, including China, Taiwan, India, Japan, South Korea, Thailand, Hong Kong, Indonesia, and Singapore. By focusing emphatically on film tourism in the non-West, this book offers a timely and crucial contribution to a more comprehensive understanding of the relation between film, culture and place, particularly in light of the increased volume of media production and consumption across Asia, and the consequent film tourism destinations that are currently popping up across the Asian continent.



10. Bollywood Sounds: The Cosmopolitan Mediations of Hindi Film Song:Jayson Beaster-Jones:



Bollywood Sounds focuses on the songs of Indian films in their historical, social, commercial, and cinematic contexts. Author Jayson Beaster-Jones takes readers through the highly collaborative compositional process, highlighting the contributions of film directors, music directors (composers), lyricists, musicians, and singers in song production. Through close musical and multimedia analysis of more than twenty landmark compositions, Bollywood Sounds illustrates how the producers of Indian film songs have long mediated a variety of musical styles, instruments, and performance practices to create a uniquely cosmopolitan music genre. As an exploration of the music of seventy years of Hindi films, Bollywood Sounds provides long-term historical insights into film songs and their musical and cinematic conventions in ways that will appeal both to scholars and to newcomers to Indian cinema

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 Author| Post time: 24-1-2019 12:45:02
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Bombay Cinema: An Archive of the City: BY Ranjani Mazumdar:


Cinema is not only a major industry in India, it is a powerful cultural force. But until now, no one has undertaken a major examination of the ways in which films made in Bombay mediate the urban experience in India. In Bombay Cinema , Ranjani Mazumdar takes a multidisciplinary approach to understanding Bombay cinema as the unofficial archive of the city in India. In this analysis of the cinematic city, Mazumdar reveals a complex postnationalist world, convulsed by the social crisis of the 1970s and transformed by the experience of globalization in the 1990s. She argues that the upheaval of postcolonial nationalism led to Bombay cinema’s articulation of urban life in entirely new terms. Specifically, the place of the village in the imaginary constitution of anticolonial nationalism gave way to a greater acknowledgment, even centrality, of urban space. Bombay Cinema takes the reader on an inventive journey through a cinematic city of mass crowds, violence, fashion, architectural fantasies, and subcultural identities. Moving through the world of gangsters and vamps, families and drifters, and heroes and villains, Bombay Cinema explores an urban landscape marked by industrial decline, civic crisis, working-class disenchantment, and diverse street life.Combining the anecdotal with the theoretical, the philosophical with the political, and the textual with the historical, Bombay Cinema leads the reader into the heart of the urban labyrinth in India, revising and deepening our understanding of both the city and the cinema. "A landmark study—carefully researched, well organized and offering refreshingly uncondescending and strikingly insightful discussions of mainstream films—that deserves to be read by anyone interested in India's popular cinema or its contemporary urban life." — Journal of Asian Studies " Bombay Cinema is an exciting and important contribution to a field that has, to date, been under researched and under theorized. Lively, provocative and richly suggestive, it will also serve as a surefire incentive to watch those films all over again." — Screen "Here, at last, is a book length study on Cinema in India that does not get locked into a dance of hermetic closure between what transpires on screen and a set of stock off screen textual and cultural references, but more importantly, walks the streets where the films are set, looks at shop windows, publicity material, costumes, fashion, architecture, telecommunications and the concrete materiality that surrounds the film object." — Seminar " Bombay Cinema is lucid, provocative, stylish and substantial. It is an illuminating scholarly study that spares no effort to bring Bombay cinema out of the academic closet." — The Book Review India "Departing from the obsession that Film Studies in India has displayed with the idea of cinema as a national allegory, the book convincingly argues for the need to examine the city's hidden archive as one that cannot be subsumed within the sign of the national." — Biblio "Mazumdar has a great capacity to discuss Indian cinema, with a brilliant grasp of its political, historical, and aesthetic developments, but equally she is well attuned to the interests and ruptures in the academic discourse of film and cinema studies."— Film International "Mazumdar's experience as a filmmaker allowed her to offer significant readings of not just the narratives and character development in the films, but of the cinematography, mise-en-scene, and other technical and performance aspects of production." — Journal of Popular Culture "At once about Hindi films, spatial practices, urban modernity and globalization . . . the strength of Bombay Cinema lies in bringing all of them together in a productive conversation.” — Economic and Political Weekly.






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 Author| Post time: 24-1-2019 17:56:10
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Routledge Handbook of Indian Cinemas: BY K. Moti Gokulsing, Wimal Dissanayake:

India is the largest film producing country in the world and its output has a global reach. After years of marginalisation by academics in the Western world, Indian cinemas have moved from the periphery to the centre of the world cinema in a comparatively short space of time. Bringing together contributions from leading scholars in the field, this Handbook looks at the complex reasons for this remarkable journey.
Combining a historical and thematic approach, the Handbook discusses how Indian cinemas need to be understood in their historical unfolding as well as their complex relationships to social, economic, cultural, political, ideological, aesthetic, technical and institutional discourses. The thematic section provides an up-to-date…
The Handbook provides a comprehensive and cutting edge survey of Indian cinemas, discussing Popular, Parallel/New Wave and Regional cinemas as well as the spectacular rise of Bollywood. It is an invaluable resource for students and academics of South Asian Studies, Film Studies and Cultural Studies.


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 Author| Post time: 24-1-2019 18:02:26
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Bollyworld : popular Indian cinema through a transnational lens: BY Raminder Kaur, Ajay J Sinha:


This ‘will of iron’ was a temperament shared by the South Londonborn
actor, enough for him to fight against all the odds and leave an indelible
mark on cinematic history, so much so that two decades later,
India had its own cute vagabond hero with a peculiar walk, Raju, played
by the phenomenal Raj Kapoor. Sauntering down the road, with a knapsack
on his shoulder and singing like there was no tomorrow in Shri 420,
Raju lyrically asserts that, even though he is a walking advertisement for
various national products—his Japanese shoes, English trousers and
Russian hat—at heart he remains an Indian.1 A song that put ‘Englistan’
firmly on the lexical map, it is essentially about material made elsewhere,
but a heart made in India. It is a narrative about the production of nationalism
through its intricate entanglement with the global, that even though
the Indian nation is swamped with all kinds of foreign influences and
products, this does not need to undermine the strength of patriotism.2 It
is the case that ‘Indianness’ is produced in relation to difference, rather
than simply being the outcome of the autochthonous processes. It is this
more transnational focus—often overlooked in nation-oriented accounts
—that this volume on Indian cinema addresses.



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 Author| Post time: 24-1-2019 18:05:20
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Studying Indian Cinema: BY Omar Ahmed:


This book traces the historical evolution of Indian cinema through a number of key decades. The book is made up of 14 chapters with each chapter focusing on one key film, the chosen films analysed in their wider social, political and historical context whilst a concerted engagement with various ideological strands that underpin each film is also evident. In addition to exploring the films in their wider contexts, the author analyses selected sequences through the conceptual framework common to both film and media studies. This includes a consideration of narrative, genre, representation, audience and mise-en-scene. The case studies run chronologically from Awaara (The Vagabond, 1951) to The Elements Trilogy: Water (2005) and…


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 Author| Post time: 24-1-2019 18:10:12
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From Aan to Lagaan and Beyond: A Guide to the Study of Indian Cinema: BY K. Moti Gokulsing, Wimal Dissanayake:


This authoritative and accessible guide is written specifically to help students understand the complexities and intricacies of Indian cinema. It covers the vast range of the cinemas of India, plus the meteoric rise of Bollywood, and discusses the key theoretical approaches to the analysis of films, the cinema audience and audience segmentation.

The book describes how an Indian movie is made and explains the technology entailed. All the major issues are discussed: the relationship between cast and crew, the contributions of designers and choreographers, the impact of the corporatization of the film industry, censorship, taxation, insurance and advertising.  

The fascinating case studies of filmic analysis illuminate the theoretical approaches and concepts that students require for analyzing Indian film. And teachers will find that the comprehensive coverage, extensive bibliography and suggestions for further reading, the discussion of pedagogical issues about the teaching of Indian cinema and the sample questions make it an indispensable resource for teaching Indian cinema.   


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 Author| Post time: 19-2-2019 17:34:47
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Indian Cinema Today: BY Chidananda Das Gupta:


The film industry of lndia is, depending upon which
statistics you emphasiae, the second, third, or fourth largest in the world.
Moreover, films have been made
in lndia since the earliest decade of the art. How then
do we explain the fact that--aside from the films of Satyajit Raylndian
films have been unable to obtain attention in the world
film scene? And what are the prospects, in the new nation
that has been growing up since independence from Britain,
for the curiously chaotic Indian film industry? This article,
by a well-known lndian critic, film-society official, and film-maker, . .
attempts to sketch answers to such questions.



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 Author| Post time: 19-2-2019 17:39:37
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The Melodramatic Public: Film Form and Spectatorship in Indian Cinema:  BY Ravi Vasudevan (auth.):




What]How do film audiences engage with socio-political issues?
What]Ravi Vasudevan addresses these questions in a wide-ranging analysis of Indian cinema.


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 Author| Post time: 19-2-2019 17:42:40
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James Ivory in Conversation: How Merchant Ivory Makes Its Movies: BY Robert Emmet Long:


James Ivory in Conversation is an exclusive series of interviews with a director known for the international scope of his filmmaking on several continents. Three-time Academy Award nominee for best director, responsible for such film classics as A Room with a View and The Remains of the Day, Ivory speaks with remarkable candor and wit about his more than forty years as an independent filmmaker. In this deeply engaging book, he comments on the many aspects of his world-traveling career: his growing up in Oregon (he is not an Englishman, as most Europeans and many Americans think), his early involvement with documentary films that first brought attention to him, his discovery of India, his friendships with celebrated figures here and abroad, his skirmishes with the Picasso family and Thomas Jefferson scholars, his usually candid yet at times explosive relations with actors. Supported by seventy illuminating photographs selected by Ivory himself, the book offers a wealth of previously unavailable information about the director's life and the art of making movies.James Ivory on:On the Merchant Ivory Jhabvala partnership:"I've always said that Merchant Ivory is a bit like the U. S. Govenment; I'm the President, Ismail is the Congress, and Ruth is the Supreme Court. Though Ismail and I disagree sometimes, Ruth acts as a referee, or she and I may gang up on him, or vice versa. The main thing is, no one ever truly interferes in the area of work of the other."On Shooting Mr. and Mrs. Bridge:"Who told you we had long 18 hour days? We had a regular schedule, not at all rushed, worked regular hours and had regular two-day weekends, during which the crew shopped in the excellent malls of Kansas City, Paul Newman raced cars somewhere, unknown to us and the insurance company, and I lay on a couch reading The Remains of the Day."On Jessica Tandy as Miss Birdseye in The Bostonians:"Jessica Tandy was seventy-two or something, and she felt she had to 'play' being an old woman, to 'act' an old woman. Unfortunately, I'couldn't say to her, 'You don't have to 'act' this, just 'be,' that will be sufficient.' You can't tell the former Blanche Du Bois that she's an old woman now."On Adapting E. M. Forster's novels"His was a very pleasing voice, and it was easy to follow. Why turn his books into films unless you want to do that? But I suppose my voice was there, too; it was a kind of duet, you could say, and he provided the melody."On India:"If you see my Indian movies then you get some idea of what it was that attracted me about India and Indians...any explanation would sound lamer than the thing warrants. The mood was so great and overwhelming that any explanation of it would seem physically thin....I put all my feeling about India into several Indian films, and if you know those films and like them, you see from these films what it was that attracted me to India."On whether he was influenced by Renoir in filming A Room with a View "I was certainly not influenced by Renoir in that film. But if you put some good looking women in long white dresses in a field dotted with red poppies, andthey're holding parasols, then people will say, 'Renoir.'"On the Critics:"I came to believe that to have a powerful enemy like Pauline Kael only made me stronger. You know, like a kind of voodoo. I wonder if it worked that way in those days for any of her other victims--Woody Allen, for instance, or Stanley Kubrick."On Andy Warhol as a dinner guest:"I met him many times over the last twenty years of his life, but I can't say I knew him, which is what most people say, even those who were his intimates. Once he came to dinner with a group of his Factory friends at my apartment. I remember that he or someone else left a dirty plate, with chicken bones and knife and fork, in my bathroom wash basin. It seemed to be a symbolic gesture, to be a matter of style, and not just bad manners."   

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